1967 Shelby GT350

1967 Shelby GT350

1967 Shelby GT350

1967 Shelby GT350

The 1967 Shelby GT350 introduced an updated body style that replaced the previous two year run of the GT350.  Some of the most unique features of the 1967 Shelby GT350 are the driving lights in the grille, and new scooped hood, mag star wheels, and side body scoops to replicate those used on the GT40 racing cars.  This is an early production 1967 Shelby GT350 as the driving lights are set in the center of the grille and there are red side marker lamps set within the upper body side scoops.

1967 Shelby

This is a highly optioned example with extra cost options such as the extra cooling package, competition handling package, deluxe steering wheel, deluxe interior, integral roll bar, remote control outside mirror, tachometer oil pressure gauge and ammeter, power steering, power disc brakes, factory shoulder harness,  Magstar wheels and a very unique option: an automatic transmission.  Best of all, it still has its numbers matching 289 engine and automatic transmission.

This 1967 Shelby GT350 was offered by Mecum Auctions and here is what they had to say about it: Behind any collector car that remains unrestored to the present day is a story. In the normal course of affairs, cars, especially a car built as a weekend racer like the GT350, suffer wear and damage that gets repaired later on when they become collectible. This 1967 Shelby GT350, #0117, however, escaped both fates. Completed on December 8, 1966, it was one of the first built yet must have been one of the last sold, as Dale Newton didn’t buy it from Portland, Oregon’s famed Ron Tonkin Ford until New Year’s Eve 1967. The slow selling may have had to do with a high sticker price, thanks to a long and very appealing option list. Shelby’s 1966 GT350s had sold to hard-core enthusiasts and casual buyers alike, but after the furor died down, those who weren’t into the weekend racing scene started to tire of the car’s uncompromising performance mission. So for the 1967 models, Shelby quieted the car down and made it more civilized, repurposing it from boy racer to civilized GT with an edge. Power steering and brakes became standard and the ride was notably less stiff.

Shelby 289

You still got the Shelby 289 making an advertised 306 HP, along with an improved fiberglass hood that foreshadowed the Shelby’s look for 1968. Increased curb weight sent 0-60 times down by about a half-second, although actual top speed increased notably, tested to 129 MPH with a 4-speed and 3.89 axle by “Sports Car Graphic,” again in keeping with a GT’s mission. That made the GT350 more suitable for daily use, and #117 was reportedly used as a daily driver by Newton’s wife in Ashland, Oregon, including taking their kids to school.

1967 GT350

She was clearly no leadfoot, as it retains its matching-numbers engine and transmission. It ended up stored for 20 years in a shipping container in Chico, California, thus preserving a wonderful degree of originality. Fully decked out with convenience and performance options and substantially original, #117 is everything a Shelby collector could want.